Sunday, August 14, 2022

CALL YOUR SENATORS: Tell Them to Include Trade Tools in Competitiveness Legislation

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It’s crunch time. Senators must include the Leveling the Playing Field Act 2.0 in competitiveness and innovation legislation.

Editor’s note: The following post was delivered to Alliance for American Manufacturing supporters via email on Monday.

More than 50,000 of you already have written to your Members of Congress to ask them to support the Leveling the Playing Field Act 2.0, which will provide America’s workers with the modern trade tools they need to take on China’s predatory trade practices. 

Now we are getting word that the Senate is set to vote this week on competitiveness legislation — a major bill that includes $52 billion in funding for semiconductor production — and the Leveling the Playing Field Act 2.0 must make it into the final legislation!

Can you please call your Senators and ask them to support inclusion of the Leveling the Playing Field Act 2.0 into the final competitiveness bill?

You can find your Senators contact information by clicking here, and here’s a simple script you can use:

“I am calling to ask the Senator to support including the Leveling the Playing Field Act 2.0 in the competitiveness and innovation legislation that the Senate is set to vote on this week. We need stronger trade enforcement tools to take on China.”

Investing in domestic production for things like semiconductors is critical. But we also need to make sure that the United States also has the right trade policy in place so our workers and manufacturers have what they need to take on China and compete in the 21st century!

By directly calling your Senators, you can be sure that Congress knows that Leveling the Playing Field Act 2.0 must be a priority. Thanks in advance for taking the time to stand up for America’s workers and manufacturers!

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Christine
Christine has always been fascinated by the industrial world. She comes from a family of industrialists and has always been surrounded by machines and factories. When she was younger, Christine would often sneak into her father's office to watch him work on his designs. She loved the way he could take something and make it better. Now Christine is following in her father's footsteps, working at an industrial company that builds machines for factories all over the world. She loves her job and finds satisfaction in being able to improve production lines and help companies become more efficient.
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